Acoustic foam
Acoustic foam mounted to drywall.

Over the past year I’ve been working on putting together a small recording studio for podcasting and audiobooks. I say “small recording studio,” but in reality we’re talking a small walk-in closet that I’ve converted for recording. It’s small, but it works for my purposes.

One of the last things I did after cleaning the closet out was put up acoustic foam. For awhile I’d relied on clothes in not-so-converted walk-in closet to dampen sound, but eventually I got tired of the cramped space and cleaned the clothes out. I needed something to deaden the sound in the room so acoustic panels it was!

It turns out mounting acoustic foam to walls can be a real pain in the ass. I tried a couple of different methods, and I figured I’d write about them here to hopefully help out someone else in a similar situation. Putting together your own studio to record your audiobooks is something a lot of authors might consider at some point considering how expensive it is to have an audiobook produced, and it’s my hope that this might help someone out there and save them some time!

Mounting options:

Double sided velcro/tape

This was the first thing I tried. It seemed simple enough. Get some double sided velcro, put it on the acoustic foam and on the wall, and stick it up there. The only problem was the stuff didn’t stay up. Sometimes the foam panel would fall down overnight, and other panels stayed up for a couple of weeks. Eventually they all fell though.

I ran into the same problem with double sided mounting strips. Think the kind of stuff that’s advertised for mounting posters and pictures to the wall. It was even worse than the double sided velcro for mounting to drywall, and I wouldn’t recommend it.

There is a good use for that double sided velcro though! Read on to see how I ended up using it effectively.

Spray adhesive

When I was at the audio store they helpfully sold spray adhesive that was supposed to be specially designed for mounting acoustic foam to the walls.

Hint: It might’ve been specially designed for acoustic foam, but they need to go back to the drawing board because it didn’t work.

What the stuff did do is stink to high heaven. We’re talking I couldn’t use my small closet recording studio for several days because I had to leave the closet and the windows in our guest bedroom open to get the smell out. There are warnings not to breathe too much of the stuff in an enclosed space too, so it’s got that going for it.

That all might’ve been worth it if the stuff worked after the smell went away, but it didn’t. It was the worst of the three things I’m covering in this blog post. It also stained the hell out of the drywall, to the point that I’m going to have to repaint in there if I ever decide to sell the place.

Acoustic foam mounting spray drywall damage
The not-so-lovely aftermath of using acoustic foam spray to mount the foam to drywall.

All in all I’d call the spray adhesive $25 of disappointment that rendered my studio useless by stinking up the place. Don’t waste your money on the stuff.

Cardboard and T-Pins

Cardboard and T-Pin foam mount
Cardboard and T-Pin foam mount

This is the solution that ultimately worked for me. I bought some T-Pins in the sewing section of the local department store. I grabbed the 1.5″ which provides enough room to push the pin through the adhesive foam and into the wall. The beauty of these things is it only takes one or two to get the foam up on the wall, and once it’s up there it doesn’t fall.

I did have some issues mounting foam to the door though. The pins wouldn’t push into the solid wood no matter how hard I pressed. So I improvises and cut some squares off of a cardboard box, pinned the foam to the cardboard, and then used double sided velcro to stick the cardboard to the door.

See? I told you the velcro would come up later!

Summing up:

Double sided velcro/tape all by its lonesome: doesn’t work

Spray adhesive: doesn’t work, stinks the place up, and costs way too much

T-Pins and cardboard: works like a charm!

If you’re looking for a way to mount acoustic foam to drywall with minimal damage and without spending too much money then T-Pins and cardboard is definitely the way to go.