Guerilla

2020 Goals: Branch into audio including podcasts and audio books

Time to talk about my first big goal for 2020! I’m getting into audio.

This is a big one that I’ve been working towards since 2017 when I started building an audio studio to do podcasting and audiobooks. I hit a bit of a snag when my daughter was born and I focused on being with her for her first year instead of doing audio, but now that things have settled down a bit at home I’m ready to do this.

My strategy for hitting audio is also part of my strategy for going wide. Audio is the fastest growing corner of the publishing market right now, and there are a lot of people listening to books and podcasts. These are my people. I’ve been an audiobook listener since the mid ’90s when the only way you could get audio was on tape. I haven’t listened to radio or music all that much since I got an iPod in the mid ’00s and discovered podcasts.

In addition there’s still a high barrier to entry for creating audiobooks, which means that there’s less competition in the market from indie authors. It can cost thousands of dollars to produce an audiobook, but if I’m able to do the recording and editing myself in my home studio then the only investment I have to make is time. It took hours spent learning Adobe Audition and audio engineering and the investment in creating the studio, but I’m hoping it’ll pay off dividends.

I’ve also wanted to start a podcast for years but never felt like I had anything to podcast about. That’s changed, though. I have ideas, and this is the plan:

Podcasting

Nonfiction Podcasting:

Motivrite: A podcast about what goes into being an indie author. I’ve learned a lot about the market over the years and would like to give back to the community by releasing a podcast with advice for authors. There are a lot of podcasts out there that focus on marketing a book and getting it to an audience, so I’m going to hit a different niche at first and talk about tips and tricks for getting the words down, and how to navigate life as a part time or full time indie.

Stretch goal – Indie Day Job: If I manage to complete all my other goals and I still have time then I’d also like to start a podcast where I talk to other indie creators about their day to day. I’m not sure if this will be happening because I already have a lot on my plate, but we’ll see. As the year goes on and some things succeed and others don’t I might have more time to launch this project.

Fiction Podcasting:

Avallanath: This is a story that’s been rattling around my head for the past decade about an author of very fat books, the fans who love to hate him, and what happens when his creations take matters into their own hands.

I started writing it while I was in grad school a decade back, and I released it as a webcomic at one point that got to be sort of popular with a few hundred people a day hitting the site daily. The problem is I’ve never been that good at drawing and I don’t feel like webcomics are a real growth area. So I plan on releasing it as an audio fiction podcast with a chapter or two a week.

Blake Byron: Paranormal Investigator: This is another story that’s been rattling around in my head for more than a decade, but I only sat down and actually wrote it in 2017. It’s the story of a former special forces soldier turned campus cop who wanted a nice quiet life. Then he came across the victim of a vampire attack, killed the vampire that killed her, and found himself in the crosshairs of the local vampires. I tried releasing this in 2017 and it didn’t meet with much success, but it’s a fun story that I enjoy and I feel like it could do well with a bit of a marketing push so I’m going to try it out in audio and see what happens.

GameLit: I have a couple of GameLit stories I’ve been working on since 2016ish when LitRPG first started taking off. The first one I plan on releasing in audio and as a wide book release is Dice Mage, which is going to be a complete rewrite of a book I released near the end of 2018 that had some moderate success, but I think it would do better being rereleased with the new longer outline I’ve worked out that tells more of a story.

Audiobooks

The plan is to release these novels wide on all ebook platforms once they’ve been finished, and then start releasing the audiobook episodes with one or two chapters being released per week to drum up interest. I’ll push people towards the finished ebooks at the end of every episode if they want to hear the whole story at once.

I also plan on releasing episodes early to backers on my Patreon which I plan on really hitting hard in 2019-2020. With a little luck I’ll be able to build an audience of readers and audiophiles who contribute for a chance to get episodes early while also adding another leg to my income table that isn’t Amazon and Kindle Unlimited.

When the books are finished in podcast form I’ll eventually release them wide as paid audiobooks as well. I won’t be going exclusive with Audible, but instead going wide with services like Findaway to diversify my income base.

Daily steps to achieve this goal

Having a lofty annual goal is all well and good, but it’s also important to think about the daily steps that’ll be necessary to make it happen. There are only so many hours in a day, and if I’m going to do everything I want to do in the 2019-2020 year then I’m going to have to focus and do it one day at a time.

The daily goal for this one is easy enough though. I’ll disappear into my home studio for a couple of hours every night after the kids are in bed and work on recording stuff. I’ll probably only do this Monday through Friday, taking weekends off to relax and have a little bit of fun.

Wrapping up

And that’s the audio plan for 2019-2020! I’m in the middle of production of episodes of Blake Byron and hope to start releasing that podcast in October to tie in with the horror vibe the book gives off. I’ve worked out outlines for nine episodes of Motivrite so far as well. I have about ten episodes of Avallanath written and will start recording that soon, and I’m currently working on finishing the updated version of Dice Mage and probably won’t begin recording that until November or December.

It’s a lot on my plate, but I really enjoy sitting in the booth and doing some recording. It gives me an opportunity to explore a new market, give another polish run on the manuscript, and flex my acting muscles which I haven’t had a chance to do in years. I’m looking forward to seeing where I’ll be in audio by next year!

Blake Byron: Paranormal Investigator

I’m trying a bit of experimenting with a novel I’ve been working on off and on for years now. Blake Byron: Paranormal Investigator is the story of a former special forces soldier who was looking for a nice quiet life as a campus cop raising his family away from the nastiness that was life in the military.

Until one night he kills a vampire on a call. The vampires in his quiet town don’t take too kindly to this, and it sets in motion a chain of events that leads to a man-on-vampire rampage with doses of humor thrown in for good measure.

I put this book up on Amazon a few months back and relied on my strategy of writing fast with an interesting cover, good blurb, and no advertising. And it flopped. Hard.

Why did it flop? I think there are a few reasons.

  1. The story is sort of in an in-between place which isn’t great if you’re looking to write to market. It’s a Paranormal/Horror/Thriller/Comedy. There is a Horror Comedy category on Amazon. There are paranormal thrillers on Amazon. I think something that falls in between all of those is a little more difficult to pigeonhole though.
  2. The cover doesn’t exactly fit with the big selling genres in paranormal. If you look at those it’s a lot of wizards and witches who are impossibly sexy wielding magic, but that didn’t really fit with what the book was so I went with something different, which is not a good idea if you’re looking to write to market.
  3. The protagonist is a badass, but again he doesn’t really fit in with the witch and wizard protagonists that are the bread and butter of paranormal categories. As such it’s going to be a more difficult sell.
  4. I didn’t put any money into traditional advertising channels. I’m typically not a huge fan of pay to play when it comes to book launches. Most of my successes have been books that were quirky with interesting covers that took off, but clearly that didn’t work here.
  5. The paranormal and urban fiction categories on Amazon are filled to the brim. it’s difficult for someone to be noticed in those categories because everyone and their mother is writing in those categories. I think the book falls more under Horror Comedy, with some overlap with Urban Fantasy, but the glut of titles makes it a more difficult sell than it would be otherwise.

Add all that stuff up and you have a book launched on hard mode. I did that intentionally though. Sure it would’ve been nice if it took off, but at the same time I knew that it was a bit of a long shot.

The thing is I already have established pen names that are making me a living, so I’m a little more comfortable with being unorthodox and experimental with some of the stuff I’m writing to release under my own name. I feel like Blake Byron is a good novel with a fun story, and so I’m going to try some unorthodox marketing strategies and see how they play out.

Right now those strategies include:

  1. Releasing chapters twice weekly in a podcasted audiobook. This lets me use some of the podcasting equipment I’ve put together in the past year with the intent of recording a podcast/audiobooks when I started releasing stuff under my name.
  2. Releasing chapters twice weekly on Royal Road Legends and Wattpad. I don’t think it will do that well at Wattpad since right now the top categories seem to be sexy vampires who fall in love with teenage girls and semi-sexy YouTubers who fall in love with teenage girls, but you never know.
  3. Launch a writing podcast that I’ve been thinking about doing since I went full time at this back in 2015. This doesn’t directly relate to publicizing fiction I’ve written, but I’m hoping that some of the traffic generated to my site might translate into people checking out my writing.

I’m going to see how much traction those options pick up. I’m also considering doing a wide release and making it a freebie to see if that gains any traction as I already have a couple of other books in the series written. I stupidly did so because I was having so much fun with it and didn’t expect it to flop as hard as it did.

You live and you learn. I’ll be sure to write updates on how it’s going. Basically I want to take a book and start from nothing. No mailing list because I don’t want my real name associated with my erotica and romance pen names that are paying the bills. No advertising because people who are starting out don’t have money to throw at advertising and I’m not a fan of the whole pay to play ecosystem that’s slowly been building up over the past few years. No Kindle Unlimited because I want to try a wide strategy that doesn’t involve Amazon pumping money into their bid for author exclusivity.

Maybe it will succeed. Maybe it’ll crash and burn. At the end of the day at least I tried something, and that’s what this business is all about!

Check it out at Royal Road!

Check it out at WattPad!